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EXW – Ex Works (named place of delivery)

The seller makes the goods available at his/her premises. The buyer is responsible for uploading. This term places the maximum obligation on the buyer and minimum obligations on the seller. The Ex Works term is often used when making an initial quotation for thesale of goodswithout any costs included. EXW means that a seller has the goods ready for collection at his premises (works, factory, warehouse, plant) on the date agreed upon. The buyer pays all transportation costs and also bears the risks for bringing the goods to their final destination. The seller does not load the goods on collecting vehicles and does not clear them for export. If the seller does load the goods, he does so at buyer's risk and cost. If parties wish seller to be responsible for the loading of the goods on departure and to bear the risk and all costs of such loading, this must be made clear by adding explicit wording to this effect in the contract of sale.

FCA – Free Carrier (named place of delivery)

The seller delivers goods, cleared for export, to the buyer-designated carrier at a named and defined location. This is used for any mode of transport. The seller must load goods onto the buyer's carrier. The key document signifying transfer of responsibility is receipt by carrier to exporter.

CPT – Carriage Paid To (named place of destination)

The seller pays for carriage. Risk transfers to buyer upon handing goods over to the first carrier at place of shipment in the country of export.

This term is used for all kind of shipments.

CIP – Carriage andInsurance Paidto (named place of destination)

The containerized transport/multimodal equivalent of CIF. Seller pays for carriage and insurance to the named destination point, but risk passes when the goods are handed over to the first carrier.

DAT – Delivered at Terminal (named terminal at port or place of destination)

The Seller delivers when the goods, once unloaded from the arrivingmeans of transport, are placed at the Buyer's disposal at a named terminal at the named port or place of destination. "Terminal" includes any place, whether covered or not, such as a quay, warehouse, container yard or road, rail or air cargo terminal. The Seller bears all risks involved in bringing the goods to and unloading them at the terminal at the named port or place of destination.

DAP – Delivered at Place (named place of destination)

DDP – Delivered Duty Paid (named place of destination)

Seller is responsible fordelivering the goodsto the named place in the country of the buyer, and pays all costs in bringing the goods to the destination including import duties and taxes. The seller is not responsible for unloading. This term is often used in place of the non-Incoterm "Free In Store (FIS)". This term places the maximum obligations on the seller and minimum obligations on the buyer.

Sea and inland waterway transport

To determine if a location qualifies for these four rules, please refer to 'United Nations Code for Trade and Transport Locations (UN/LOCODE)'. [Link below]

The four rules defined by Incoterms 2010 forinternational tradewhere transportation is entirely conducted by water are:

FAS – free alongside Ship (named port of shipment)

The seller must place the goods alongside the ship at the named port. The seller must clear the goods for export. Suitable only for maritime transport but NOT for multimodal sea transport in containers (see Incoterms 2010, ICC publication 715). This term is typically used for heavy-lift or bulk cargo.

FOB – Free on Board (named port of shipment)

The seller must load the goods on board a vessel designated by the buyer. Cost and risk are divided when the goods are actually on board of the vessel. The seller must clear the goods for export. The term is applicable for maritime and inland waterway transport only but NOT for multimodal sea transport in containers (see Incoterms 2010, ICC publication 715). The buyer must instruct the seller the details of the vessel and the port where the goods are to be loaded, and there is no reference to, or provision for, the use of a carrier or forwarder. This term has been greatly misused over the last three decades ever since Incoterms 1980 explained that FCA should be used for container shipments.

It means the seller pays for transportation of goods to the port of shipment, loading cost. The buyer pays cost of marine freight transportation, insurance, uploading and transportation cost from the arrival port to destination. The passing of risk occurs when the goods are on board the vessel.

CFR – Cost and Freight (named port of destination)

Seller must pay the costs and freight to bring the goods to the port of destination. However, risk is transferred to the buyer once the goods are loaded on the vessel. Insurance for the goods is NOT included. This term is formerly known as CNF (C&F, or C+F). Maritime transport only.

CIF – Cost, Insurance and Freight (named port of destination)

Exactly the same as CFR except that the seller must in addition procure and pay for the insurance. Maritime transport only. Freight

Previous terms from Incoterms 2000 eliminated from Incoterms 2010

DAF – Delivered at Frontier (named place of delivery)

This term can be used when the goods are transported by rail and road. The seller pays for transportation to the named place of delivery at the frontier. The buyer arranges for customs clearance and pays for transportation from the frontier to his factory. The passing of risk occurs at the frontier.

DES – Delivered Ex Ship (named port of delivery)

Where goods are delivered ex ship, the passing of risk does not occur until the ship has arrived at the named port of destination and the goods made available for unloading to the buyer. The seller pays the same freight and insurance costs as he would under a CIF arrangement. Unlike CFR and CIF terms, the seller has agreed to bear not just cost, but also Risk and Title up to the arrival of the vessel at the named port. Costs for unloading the goods and any duties, taxes, etc. are for the Buyer. A commonly used term in shipping bulk commodities, such as coal, grain, dry chemicals; and where the seller either owns or has chartered, their own vessel.

DEQ – Delivered Ex Quay (named port of delivery)

This is similar to DES, but the passing of risk does not occur until the goods have been unloaded at the port of discharge.

DDU – Delivered Duty Unpaid (named place of destination)

This term means that the seller delivers the goods to the buyer to the named place of destination in thecontract of sale. A transaction in international trade where the seller is responsible for making a safe delivery of goods to a named destination, paying all transportation expenses but not the duty. The seller bears the risks and costs associated with supplying the goods to the delivery location, where the buyer becomes responsible for paying the duty and other customs clearing expenses.

FCL (Full Container Load) and general cargo services https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Containerization#Full_container_load

From / to major ports and markets round the globe, regardless of the size and weight of your shipments; we give you the best choice that meets your requirements. . We prepare your shipment to move smoothly from point of origin to destination by accomplishing its relevant formalities and approval 

As one of the world's leading Non-Vessel Operating Common Carriers (NVOCC), we have the carrier relationships to offer frequent departures at competitive rates for full container load (FCL) shipments from major ports around the world. 

LCL (Less-Than-Container Load) 

When you don't have enough cargo for a full container, we offer less-than-container load (LCL) departures between major ports, managing every step to give you visibility throughout the process. 

Preferred LCL

When you need to bridge the gap between air and ocean, UPS Preferred® LCL delivers from Asia and Europe to the U.S. and Canada transit times up to 40 percent faster than standard LCL routing without compromising on the economy you've come to expect.

Sea/Air Service

When you have faster transit time requirements and air freight is too expensive, our sea/air service is an effective solution combining the economies of ocean freight with the speed of air freight.

Project Cargo

When you need a customized single-project solution for movement of specialized equipment or involving specialized charter vessels, PFS Project Cargo Management solutions deliver global coverage, managed costs, and reliable project continuity.